Tag Archives: Doctor Strange

Thor: Ragnarok – What I Missed (Part 1)

thor 6I had mixed feelings as I sat in my seat waiting for the outro at the end of the credits for Thor: Ragnarok. On the one hand, I was thoroughly entertained for over two hours. On the other, I was disappointed by what I hadn’t seen. I realize that appreciation can be colored by prior expectations, and I really expected a lot out of this movie (maybe too much). I’ll have to see it again to get a more balanced perspective.  I’ll divide my comments into three areas: what I liked, what I didn’t like, and (perhaps most importantly) what I missed.

To begin with, I loved the first part. The opening sequence was visually satisfying, and the dialogue and action were engaging.

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It is in this opening that we meet Surtur, the fire demon who is capably played by Clancy Brown.

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We also meet Skurge, the negligent interim keeper of the Bifrost, as played by Karl Urban.

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The segment with Doctor Strange might have been a bit incongruous, but it was visually effective and very interesting. I am very intrigued by this character.

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The first scene where Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and Loki (Tom Hiddleston) speak one last time with Odin (Anthony Hopkins) was beautifully done, and I liked seeing Odin portrayed as an old man in normal clothing. The idea of gods among us in the guise of mere mortals resonated with me.

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The set up and reveal of Hela was well-crafted and intriguingly done. She, like Loki, comes from Norse mythology, and (like Loki) she is a different kind of villain. I enjoyed the scenes in which she was depicted, and Cate Blanchett did a wonderful job portraying her.

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Up to this point, I was satisfied with the development of the mythological elements in the plot. Then came the middle. I’ve always liked how Marvel uses humor to diffuse the tension, but I felt that this time it almost smothered it.

The introduction of the deranged Grandmaster as played by Jeff Goldblum managed to add a humorous sense of dread before the jokes threatened to take over.

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There were good scenes and ideas throughout the rest of the movie, but I felt they were overly subordinated to the jokes. The contrast of dread followed by an instant of comic relief didn’t feel as if it had been given sufficient time to build. Also, I wonder if there was too much reliance on phrases and slapstick sequences from past movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

The almost Shakespearian nobility of Thor is a great straight line for the punch lines which involve him. I was sorry to see that sense of nobility lessened as much as it was, partly because I thought it lessened the impact of the humor, which much of the time was genuinely funny. I’m all for evolving a character, but I’m also all for maintaining sufficient continuity to make that evolution more plausible.

Well, this is taking longer than I had anticipated, so I’d better continue this thread next week.

The Modern Pantheon: Doctor Strange

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I have seen two movies from Disney Marvel Studios that represent rather radical departures from what I had watched before. Doctor Strange is one of them, and I will take a look at the other next week.

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Featuring a stellar cast and mind-bending special effects in an intriguing blend of eastern mysticism and science fiction, this was complexly designed, and appropriate attention was paid to the philosophical concepts underlying the strange physics. Even though there were no references to my own faith, my Christian orientation helped me to track with some of the themes – most notably, that of hidden dimensions within our everyday surroundings.

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I also related to the theme of the arrogant but talented doctor who receives his come-uppance and learns humility as his understanding of the universe is expanded.

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I’m a college professor, and I have humorously thought what it would be like to hear any of my students exclaim to me Strange’s earnest petition to The Ancient One: “Teach me!”

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What a lineup: Benedict Cumberbatch as Doctor Strange, Tilda Swinton as The Ancient One, Chiwetel Ejiofor as Mordo, Benedict Wong as (well…) Wong, Rachel McAdams as Christine Palmer, and Mads Mikkelson as Kaecillius, etc.

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Owing to the busy (but, strangely, not distracting) visuals and dense concepts, this is one movie that merits repeated viewings. This character makes an interesting addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The doctor is in.

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